Aberdeen, Idaho

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Russet Burbank
  russet-burbank Background:

Developed in 1914 by Lou Sweet, a previous president of the Potato Association of America. Scientist Luther Burbank is credited with the discovery of the original seeds. While Idaho growers have successfully produced many varieties over the years, the Russet Burbank is their greatest commercial success and has established a strong brand equity for the state. A late-maturing variety that requires a 140- to 150-day growing season.

Appearance:

The exterior skin is relatively thin and light brown in color. The exterior shape is oval and slightly flattened, with few shallow eyes. The interior is off-white to ivory and moderately dense.

Flavor Profile:

A distinctive, earthy potato flavor. The high solid (starch) yields a grainy texture and slightly chewy skin. Bakes up dry and fluffy; fries crisp and golden brown.

Usage:

Fresh, frozen, or dehydrated, this variety is well suited to all preparation styles.
Russet Norkotah
russet-norkotah Background:

Released in 1987 by North Dakota State University, this variety now ranks second in popularity for fresh-market use. Attractive type (refers to consistent oval shape); a high percentage of No. 1 potatoes is common with this early-maturing variety.

Appearance:

Excellent conformation; attractive medium-brown color with a long to oblong shape.

Flavor Profile:

A mild potato flavor with a soft texture and moderate density. Tends to bake up creamy and moist, not grainy. Moderately chewy skin. White to pale yellow interior. A low to medium specific gravity for most; some have higher starch content.

Usage:

Grown primarily for the fresh market. Because of the uniform appearance, has had good success in the retail grocery segment and increasing acceptance in foodservice.
Klondike Goldust
Klondike-Goldust Beautiful golden skin and tasty golden flesh meets wonderful texture and flavor. This yellow-skinned, yellow-fleshed potato is a part of the exclusive Klondike potato family and provides a great tasting new offering. A unique yellow potato with a smooth, bright, thin skin and a hearty potato flavor. You will enjoy this new variety and find it a versatile potato that can be roasted, grilled, mashed, fried, baked, and added to salads.
Klondike Rose
Klondike-Rose A beautiful rose-colored skin with an amazing gold-colored flesh and taste that is simply unbelievable! Combine this with a buttery texture so smooth and delicious that this is a truly remarkable potato. Consumers have received this delicious new variety with great enthusiasm.
Chieftain Red
Red-Chieftan-Potatoes-New CHARACTERISTICS: Chieftain has medium maturity, high yield potential and attractive tuber type. It is widely adapted. Plants are medium to large and spreading. Stems are medium green without other pigmentation, having nodes the same diameter as the stem with prominent wings. Leaves are dark green, slightly pubescent with numerous secondary leaflets. Flowers are light violet, anthers are yellow, with a moderate amount of fertile pollen. Tubers are oblong to round, medium thick with a smooth, medium red skin and white flesh. Eyes are shallow and well distributed on tubers. Tubers separate easily from the stolons and have a medium dormancy. STRENGTHS & WEAKNESSES: Chieftain has wide adaptability and good yield potential. Tubers are attractive and well suited for the table stock market. Processing quality for chips and french fries is not acceptable. Chieftain is moderately resistant to scab, resistant to mild mosaic, stem end browning and net necrosis caused by current season leaf roll. Tubers tend to skin

Grains are small, hard, dry seeds, with or without attached hulls or fruit layers, harvested for human or animal consumption.[1] Agronomists also call the plants producing such seeds “grain crops”. The two main types of commercial grain crops are cereals such as wheat and rye, and legumessuch as beans and soybeans.

After being harvested, dry grains are more durable than other staple foods such as starchy fruits (plantains, breadfruit, etc.) and tubers (sweet potatoes, cassava, etc.). This durability has made grains well suited to industrial agriculture, since they can be mechanically harvested, transported by rail or ship, stored for long periods in silos, and milled for flour or pressed for oil. Thus, major global commodity markets exist for canola, maize,rice, soybeans, wheat, and other grains but not for tubers, vegetables, or other cro

imgres-1 Sugar beet, cultivated Beta vulgaris, is a plant whose root contains a high concentration of sucrose. It is grown commercially for sugar production. Sugar beetsand other B. vulgaris cultivars, such as beetroot and chard, share a common wild ancestor, the sea beet(Beta vulgaris maritima).